PM doesn’t like IPA’s lunchtime libertarian seminars

May 31, 2012

From John Roskam

“We don’t cut spending, or shrink the real size of Government, in a lunchtime libertarian seminar. We do it in long days of expenditure review.”

Julia Gillard said that last night. Nice of her to think of the IPA! But she’s wrong. We have dinnertime libertarian seminars too.

Here’s some suggestions from our previous lunchtime libertarian seminars on how to shrink government:

They’re all pretty crazy ideas. Only libertarians at lunchtime would think of them. And only libertarians like the IPA’s Professor Sinclair Davidson over at the fantastic Catallaxy Files would think our national debt is not something to boast about.

Hasn’t been a great few weeks for the United Nations. First the BBC mistakes it for a computer game (funny). Then the UN agency ‘responsible for tourism’ (no, I didn’t either) makes Robert Mugabe ‘an international tourism ambassador‘ (not so funny). Then they deny itsort of. Tuesday’s Guardian explains.

Which reminds me. If you divide up the UN member countries into free, partly free, and not free (like Freedom House does) and made it look like the Australian House of Representatives you’d get this:

Yep – I’m happy to hand over regulation of the internet to the UN.

Here’s the latest good idea from Nobel-laureate Paul Krugman. Government should lie to people so government gets to spend more money. (Warning. Aliens are involved. Really.)

Maybe Krugman was inspired by last week’s Hey – Should we build a death star? Hey reader Philip Moore certainly was. Read his magnificent 508 word response.

In Defence of Freedom of Speech: From Ancient Greece to Andrew Bolt has just been published by the IPA and the Mannkal Economic Education Foundation (and sent free to IPA members). Read about it here. Get your copy here.

From now on you’ll get Hey from other members of the IPA team like James Paterson, not just me. As the IPA keeps growing (we’ve doubled in size since Hey started back in February 2009) I’m spending more time with members. Email James anytime on jpaterson@ipa.org.au.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

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Should we build a death star?

May 24, 2012

From James Paterson

Today we learned the Prime Minister spent $53,000 to run a couple of blogs.

I wish that was the worst of it. Here’s just some of the other 900+ websites taxpayers fund:

This post proves there’s nothing Paul Krugman won’t say to defend Keynesianism. (He may as well have written “Gee it’s a shame Italy wasn’t hit by a tsunami”). This fantastic video is the best response to his lunacy.

On Monday our friends at the UK Taxpayers’ Alliance released this excellent report on why David Cameron needs to go radical and rip up the tax system. It produced this gem of a headline: ‘Turn off your iPad, David Cameron, and start dealing with Britain’s debt’.

And you’ll love this by the man many Tories think would be a better PM, Boris Johnson, on what’s wrong with the BBC in The Telegraph last week.

But the most important policy question facing the world is really should we build the death star?

The next time someone offers you a wholemeal organic lentil pomegranate fruit and nut bar, slow cooked in the tears of unicorns, make them read this story.

Here’s a wonderful essay by Toby Young in The Spectator this week on how education and relativism are weakening the bonds of Western Civilisation.

The HR Nicholls Society is having its annual conference next month featuring the IPA’s Louise Staley, Stuart Wood SC and Kathy Jackson. RSVP here.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

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No joke. The carbon tax literally funds basket-weaving.

May 17, 2012

From James Paterson

Here’s something you might be surprised to learn your carbon tax dollars were funding: tea ceremonies and basket-weaving. And I’m sure you didn’t know it cost taxpayers this much!

Last week the Gillard government sacrificed a company tax cut for increased welfare handouts. Brand new research from the IPA’s Julie Novak shows why it’s a big problem:

Of course, Julie’s research is nowhere near as insightful as this US government study…of studies. But here’s a cool study: estimating the damage bill to New York City if The Avengers movie actually happened.

Last week we told you about Will Smith’s enthusiasm for higher taxes. It’s comforting to know even Will has his limits.

This may be the biggest Nanny State edition of Hey ever.

The war on free speech continues. New York legislators want to force you to post your home address online if your blog comments ‘offend readers’. You’ll enjoy the irony of this great defence of free speech by Ron Merkel…from 1994. (Read what David Kemp had to say about Merkel in the latest IPA Review). In Defence of Freedom of Speech: From Ancient Greece to Andrew Bolt is an important new book by Chris Berg that will be sent to IPA members free next week. If you’re not a member – sign up here – or place your order for the book here.

Here’s some great reading: Roger Scruton on why the left is so much better at government, and Guy Sorman in the April edition of City Journal on why we must defend creative destruction.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

 

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We apologise…

May 10, 2012

From James Paterson

Australia has the world’s best paid public servants. But guess which state has the most? (Hint: it’s where Bob Brown once saw a comet called ‘Global Democracy’.)

Please accept our humble apologies. Last month we put Will Smith on the cover of the IPA Review, as part of our story on the top 20 pro-freedom films you must see. And then he goes and does this.

This great chart from The Atlantic this week tells you everything you need to know about the Euro. It turns out a monetary union with all countries starting with the letter ‘m’ would make more sense!

And if you think Europe really is undertaking radical austerity then you haven’t seen this graph from the National Review Online on Monday. If this is austerity I’d hate to see what the new French President has in mind!

Oxford University is a very serious institution. Which is of course why the penalty for joking about your ‘great rack’ is a four and a half hour inquisition.

How many trees is one dead tree worth? One Victorian council thinks the answer is 200. Native vegetation laws are an outrageous attack on property rights, which is why we were pleased to see at least one state government finally willing to do something about it. (Surprise, surprise, it’s not the state with the most public servants.)

What better way to celebrate Friedrich Hayek’s 113th birthday than by looking at these amazing photographs showing how capitalism transformed East Germany?

If you’re anything like me you’ve wondered why young people are so enthralled with dystopian fiction like The Hunger Games (recently released on the big screen). This long piece in The New Yorker tries to explain. And Learn Liberty reveals the hidden libertarian themes of the recent box-office hit.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

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Institute of Public Affairs | Level 2 | 410 Collins Street | Melbourne | Victoria | 3000 | Australia

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