A pint please, I’m watching my figure

April 18, 2013

From James Paterson

Politicians love to tell you how many jobs they’ve ‘created’. Next time you hear that, remember this new Institute of Public Affairs research: your taxes funded most of them.

null

You can read all about why this matters in Dr Julie Novak’s important article for On Line Opinion yesterday.

Let’s hope all those taxpayer-financed jobs are being put to better use than at the extraordinary saga that is Germany’s new airport.

This might surprise you: which country has performed better at promoting women in the workplace – Sweden or America? And if the answer to this next question surprises you, you obviously don’t love freedom: what’s healthier – beer or water?

I’ll tell you who really doesn’t love freedom: North Korean shills George Galloway (apparently their culture hasn’t been “penetrated by globalisation”) and Dennis Rodman (who plans to “just hang and have some fun” with his buddy Kim Jong-un). This review in the Wall Street Journal of a powerful book on North Korea tells you everything you need to know about the regime and its boosters.

Sadly Tom Palmer has now left Australia after a fantastic tour talking about the end of the welfare state. If you missed one of Tom’s presentations, make the time to watch his great speech from Melbourne last week. It’s 40 minutes long and it’s worth every one.

On Monday night the IPA’s John Roskam gave a public lecture in Berri in South Australia on freedom of speech. The Riverland is definitely the land of the free. You’ll enjoy what the local newspaper the Murray Pioneer had to say about the ABC a few weeks ago!

If you are in Brisbane on Wednesday 1 May make sure you come to our special freedom of speech briefing featuring Janet Albrechtsen and Michael Kroger. If you come we’ll even give you a free copy of Chris Berg’s excellent book, In Defence of Freedom of Speech. RSVP here.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

Click here to view Hey on the web | Click here to forward this email to a friend | Click here to unsubscribe

Institute of Public Affairs | Level 2 | 410 Collins Street | Melbourne | Victoria | 3000 | Australia

Subscribe to Hey... what did I miss, delivered each week for free directly into your inbox.

Thatcher, Murdoch and Abbott on freedom

April 11, 2013

From John Roskam

The world has lost a champion for freedom.

If there’s one piece you read on Margaret Thatcher make it this by Conrad Black in the National Review Online on Tuesday. If there’s two or three read (in priority) Boris Johnson in The Telegraph, Brendan O’Neill from Spiked, and Peter Oborne also from The Telegraph (which was reprinted in Tuesday’s Age – how did a pro-Thatcher piece slip through?)

Last week Rupert Murdoch delivered this unforgettable speech on the morality of markets at the 70th anniversary dinner of the IPA.

And Tony Abbott gave a great speech – including what he thought of our idea to be like Gough Whitlam.

Selling the ABC is number 50 on the IPA’s list of things to do for an Abbott government. If you want proof why the ABC should be sold, listen to this 12 minute interview/interrogation on Radio National from Monday with Tom Palmer about the welfare state. Tom is from the Atlas Economic Research Foundation and Cato Institute in Washington and has been speaking at IPA events around Australia. This is about his book – and buy it here.

On Andrew Bolt’s blog there’s a really good line-up of classic Thatcher videos – including my favourite from 1981. Back in 2011 I wrote about one of the classic Thatcher stories.

Peter Reith in yesterday’s Australian Financial Review explained what Thatcher meant for Australia (behind a paywall). And this from taxpayer-funded students at Melbourne University reveals how barbaric some people are.

Margaret Thatcher changed Britain – but obviously not enough. This ridiculous Nanny State ban was imposed by a school in Essex a few weeks ago – it involves triangular flapjacks.

And a government spokesperson thinks they’re a bit of a comedian – ‘we often come across half-baked decisions…but this one takes the biscuit.’

Meanwhile in America…guess what else has been outlawed in New Hampshire schools. And on Tuesday the Washington Times reported the Commerce Department is charging other government agencies for reports that can be googled for free.

If you’re reading this on your Samsung smartphone you’ll enjoy this 4000 word piece from Bloomberg a fortnight ago on how Samsung will beat Apple and take over the world – it’s very interesting.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

 

Click here to view Hey on the web | Click here to forward this email to a friend | Click here to unsubscribe

Institute of Public Affairs | Level 2 | 410 Collins Street | Melbourne | Victoria | 3000 | Australia

Subscribe to Hey... what did I miss, delivered each week for free directly into your inbox.

70 years of fighting for freedom

April 5, 2013

From James Paterson

Some people never learn. You will not believe what the Obama administration is planning to do to “boost” the US economy.

And some things never change – here’s a great list of warnings about the Nanny State…from 1919. But even they never could have imagined that one day people would be banned from saying ‘bingo’.

It’s no secret we’re not the biggest fans of David Cameron here at the IPA. But credit where credit is due – this is an astonishing reform.

Last night the IPA celebrated our 70th Anniversary with Rupert Murdoch and many other special guests in Melbourne. Here’s an extract from his important and philosophical speech. (We’ll have the full video next week). And here’s some photos from the night.

As you might have heard, we had some unexpected guests. This is what they did to Lord Mayor Robert Doyle’s car. But really we should be thanking the protestors. They helped us raise much more than we expected for the IPA. And all the media coverage they helped generate this morning has prompted dozens of new members to sign up online!

This is the short video we screened last night featuring Dr David Kemp explaining why the IPA was founded in 1943, and why we are needed now more than ever:

If you’re in Melbourne next Thursday make sure you get along to the Sir Paul Hasluck Foundation lecture with General Peter Cosgrove. Details and RSVP here.

The Australian Taxpayers’ Alliance is launching a new course in economics for young people in Sydney – apply here. And the HR Nicholls Society is seeking a part time administrator – details here.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

Click here to view Hey on the web | Click here to forward this email to a friend | Click here to unsubscribe

Institute of Public Affairs | Level 2 | 410 Collins Street | Melbourne | Victoria | 3000 | Australia

Subscribe to Hey... what did I miss, delivered each week for free directly into your inbox.


Subscribe in your RSS reader