The least untruthful Hey

June 13, 2013

From James Paterson

This week everyone’s talking about the US government’s massive surveillance programs. This is a great summary from Reason, and the WSJ explains who the key players are. Senator Rand Paul wrote the best critique of the Obama Administration. Here is our media release on why Australians should be worried. But this and thisare the funniest responses.

But really, what’s everyone complaining about? The White House gave “the least untruthful answer” to Congress. And it might have even helped Australia get a temporary seat on the UN Security Council!

Labor MP Andrew Leigh apparently wants to ban journalists making predictions and forecasts. Wayne Swan would be in big trouble if that applied to politicians. Actually, so would Andrew Leigh.

Normally we wouldn’t advocate Australia following Europe, but if Tony Abbott wanted to follow Greece’s lead and implement this sensible public policy measure, we wouldn’t complain. (The Greek government must’ve read Hey last week!)

Last week Hey readers loved this video with Mary Kissel on the threat to freedom posed by cyclists. If you didn’t agree with it you’ll probably enjoy this response from Jon Stewart on The Daily Show.

Nobel prize winning economist Robert Fogel passed away this week. This 2008 IPA Review article by Louise Staley explains some of his most important work.

The IPA is now fundraising for our End of Financial Year Appeal – and we’d be very grateful for your tax-deductible donation to help fund our research.

There are still places available at the HR Nicholls Society annual conference in Melbourne on 8 July. RSVP here to hear speakers including Paul Fletcher MP on the union-dominated superannuation industry.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

 

Click here to view Hey on the web | Click here to forward this email to a friend | Click here to unsubscribe

Institute of Public Affairs | Level 2 | 410 Collins Street | Melbourne | Victoria | 3000 | Australia

 

Subscribe to Hey... what did I miss, delivered each week for free directly into your inbox.


Subscribe in your RSS reader