Hey readers don’t like the Greens, Piketty and soccer

December 18, 2014

From James Paterson

This is the last edition of Hey for 2014. We’ve sent out 1,004,023 individual Hey emails to the 20,647 of you that get Hey.

The three most popular Hey links for the year were:

  • Why The Conversation thinks reforming higher education breaches international law (1,282 people clicked it)
  • Lending a wedding car could land you in jail (1,219 people)
  • The World Health Organisation’s helpful definition of a ‘fall’ (1,217 people)

The three most popular videos of the year were:

The three least popular links were:

  • Why Americans love soccer (21 people clicked it)
  • The link to buy Thomas Piketty’s book on Amazon (why am I not surprised?) – (22 people)
  • The Greens’ opposition to anti-terrorism laws (32 people)

And these were my three favourite Hey stories of the year:

  • The solution devised by West Dunbartonshire Council in the UK to ensure a wheelchair-using resident could enter their house easily
  • The Saturday Papers take on the IPA’s ‘hidden‘ influence
  • This graph on which media outlet has the biggest presence in parliament house

The IPA’s new book, Climate Change: The Facts 2014 is now out. You can read this extract from Andrew Bolt’s excellent chapter in the book on the failed predictions of the IPCC and their fellow travellers. Order your copy before midnight tonight and we’ll send it to you before Christmas.

We are still gratefully accepting tax-deductible donations to our 2014 Annual Giving Appeal. If you’d like to support the IPA to continue to be a loud voice for freedom in the future, click here.

And Hey will be back in January. Merry Christmas.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

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A filter by any other name

December 11, 2014

From Peter Gregory

It’s gotten worse.

Remember last week we told you how Australia wasn’t a low taxing country after all? The IPA’s Dr Mikayla Novak’s analysis of new data for 2012 released by the OECD in Paris yesterday shows that Australians are being taxed more every year:

Here is the press release Mikayla put out this morning, here is her report on the previous data and here is her Factsheet:

Where have all the entrepreneurs gone? That’s the question the IPA’s Ian Mence Fellow for Entrepreneurship Dominic Talimanidis asked in his recent report featured in The Australian Financial Review ($) on Tuesday:


Here’s the Factsheet on it and here is Dominic’s press release

What filters which internet sites you can view, but is not an internet filter? The government’s new online piracy scheme, according to Malcolm Turnbull and George Brandis. The IPA’s Chris Berg disagrees.

Two weeks ago I said the IPA had made it as a social phenomenon because we got more boos than Rupert Murdoch at a Save the ABC rally – a few days ago, the IPA was attacked by a Nobel Prize winner!

The Economist has picked its best books for 2014. Guess which comes out on top in the economics section? Typical from The Economist

And it was revealed in The Herald Sun on Monday that Melbourne City Council have set up a program whereby Melburnians can email the city’s trees. Yep, that happened.

If you think that’s bad, two weeks ago the Chinese government banned puns on radio and television. For example, jokes about a man from Fruitvale, Colorado being arrested for pointing a banana at police would land you in trouble – even though it actually happened in the same week.

As featured on Friday in The Australian ($), the IPA’s Director of the Legal Rights Project Simon Breheny and Morgan Begg released a report showing 262 breaches of fundamental legal rights in federal laws. Here is their press release and here is Simon’s piece explaining the report in The Australian on the same day.

And, featured in The Australian ($) today, this report from Chris Berg and Darcy Allen argues that over-regulation threatens the sharing economy revolution. Here is their press release.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

Click here to view Hey on the web | Click here to unsubscribe

Institute of Public Affairs | Level 2 | 410 Collins Street | Melbourne | Victoria | 3000 | Australia

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Australia low taxing…if you don’t count all the taxes

December 4, 2014

From James Paterson

New Institute of Public Affairs research released today busts the myth that Australia is a low taxing country. Analysis by the IPA’s Dr Mikayla Novak, reported in The Australian this morning ($), shows that including compulsory superannuation and health insurance mandates with federal, state and local taxes puts Australia just under the OECD average tax burden. It’s even worse when compared with our neighbours and major trading partners:

You can download the full report here.

Raising Australia’s already high taxes is not the answer to our budget crisis – especially when there are so many areas of government spending that should be cut, as Family First Senator Bob Day and Liberal Democrat Senator David Leyonhjelm explained in speeches to the Senate last week.

Last week we told you about the Labor and National Party Senators who love Bitcoin. This week you can read Mikayla Novak’s submission to their Senate inquiry, which urges the government not to stifle this exciting innovation.

The Victorian Coalition government lost office on Saturday after just four years in power. On The Bolt Report on Sunday, IPA executive director explained who was to blame (hint: not Tony Abbott):

Writing in The Age on Tuesday, I argued that the government’s policies strayed too far from Liberal values. Also on Tuesday, the IPA’s Simon Breheny argued in The Australian Financial Review that Victoria’s failure to enact economic reform will hold it back for years. And in The Drum, Chris Berg said Victoria’s fixed four year terms are a proven failure.

This is a fascinating essay from the December edition of Standpoint, on why the time is right for Boris Johnson to become leader of the Conservative Party. And I know you will love James Delingpole’s take on ABC cuts, published in Breitbart on Saturday.

Now’s your last chance to secure your ticket to hear David Leyonhjelm, Tim Wilson, Chris Berg and Simon Breheny discuss ‘Liberty in the Digital Age’ in Sydney next Thursday 11 December. Book here.

The IPA is now gratefully accepting donations to our 2014 Annual Giving Appeal. Click here to make your tax-deductible donation to ensure the IPA remains a loud voice for freedom in Australia.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

Click here to view Hey on the web | Click here to unsubscribe

Institute of Public Affairs | Level 2 | 410 Collins Street | Melbourne | Victoria | 3000 | Australia

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