Spuds and science will land you in jail

September 24, 2015

From James Paterson

In April, we told you household goods were getting a lot cheaper – thanks to economic freedom.

Food is getting dramatically cheaper too, as this chart from a forthcoming research paper by the IPA’s Dr Mikayla Novak shows:

Imagine how cheap food would be if WA didn’t threaten to jail freedom-fighting farmers like Tony Galati for growing too many potatoes! We’ve told you about WA’s spud tsar in Hey before – as far back as 2012.

Tony will be in good company in jail though if these 20 climate scientists, who wrote to President Obama this month, get their way. You can read their original letter, calling for a federal racketeering and corrupt organisations investigation into climate sceptics, here.

It’s in part because of the left’s embrace of such authoritarianism that the British writer Nick Cohen has renounced them. Read his brilliant essay for this week’s Spectator on why Jeremy Corbyn and his supporters finally drove Cohen to quit the left.

Talk about buyer’s remorse. The Nobel Committee is starting to wonder whether President Obama really did deserve the encouragement award/Nobel Peace Prize just eight and a half months after he took office.

But – credit where credit is due – last week President Obama gave this terrific answer about the stifling political correctness at universities.

If Lord of the Flies were written by today’s politically correct university students, it might read something like this, in The New Yorker this month.

And Ahmed the clock-maker is just the latest in a long line of students harshly punished by overzealous school administrators, as The Daily Signal explains.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

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The CFMEU likes cheap stuff too

September 17, 2015

From James Bolt

When the IPA’s Chris Berg and Simon Breheny were giving evidence about the unintended effects of the Nanny State to the Senate inquiry last Friday, they should have shown them this photo:

You can watch Chris’ opening statement to the Senate Nanny State inquiry on the rise of paternalism in Australian policymaking here. The IPA’s comprehensive 39 page submission to the inquiry is available here.

It actually happened. Jeremy Corbyn is now the leader of the UK Labour Party. On Monday, Corbyn gave the position of Shadow Chancellor to John McDonnell, a man who:

Read the rest of McDonnell’s bizarre political history in this great Telegraph listCapX called the rest of Corbyn’s shadow cabinet “a piece of political satire” on Monday.

Last week Queen Elizabeth II became the longest serving British monarch. Mark Steyn explained why she remains such a unifying presence last Wednesday. Any Hey reader in Copenhagen next week can see Mark with Douglas Murray and Flemming Rose at this event talking about why free speech must be defended.

(Perhaps because, as Steyn points out, free speech advocates keep being shot at or driven into hiding.)

Flemming Rose’s latest book explains the Danish cartoon controversy and its effect on free speech around the world. Chris Berg has a review of the book in the upcoming IPA Review, which you can read here.

It looks like the CFMEU is a bastion of free trade after all. Their members were wearing official CFMEU merchandise that was ‘Made in China‘… at protests against the China-Australia Free Trade Agreement. Chris Berg explained two weeks ago why the unions are wrong about ChAFTA.

Australia has fallen to 11th in the Fraser Institute’s Economic Freedom of the World index, after being fifth in 2010. On FreedomWatch, the IPA’s Dr Mikayla Novak explains what needs to happen for Australia to restore its high ranking.

Professor Geoffrey Blainey gave a magnificent talk on the history of mining to the Minerals Council of Australia last Wednesday. Watch it here.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

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We made Greenpeace mad

September 10, 2015

From Peter Gregory

Greenpeace is not happy with the IPA.

On Friday, they demanded we donate the US$100,000 prize for the Atlas Network’s prestigious international Templeton Freedom Award (if we win) to “a charity that is helping poorer nations to deal with the impact of climate change”.

Since when did Greenpeace care about the poor? They don’t like: 

(For the IPA’s position on each of these issues, click here, here and here).

Check out these pictures of common fruit and veg before humans started genetically modifying them millennia ago. I can’t imagine them being munched on in the Greenpeace tea room (actually, I can).

Maybe the US government aren’t using genetically modified fruit and veg in their healthy lunch program – according to The Daily Signal on Monday, a report has found that school children are largely tossing the food in the bin

Read James Campbell in The Herald Sun ($) this morning and Brett Hogan on FreedomWatch also this morning for everything you need to know about the transport strikes currently afflicting Melbourne.

Here’s a piece from Paul Krugman in The New York Times on Monday praising Donald Trump for his economic policies. I’m sure they both feel equally dirty.

And just to really throw you, here’s P.J. O’Rourke praising Joe Biden in The Daily Beast last Saturday.

This is an interesting long blog post from The Righteous Mind author Jonathan Haidt on the cultural origins of microaggressions. It may explain why a Leicester theatre company has named its upcoming production Snow White and the Seven Friends...

Best-selling author Professor Ian Plimer’s new book – Heaven and Hell: The Pope condemns the poor to eternal poverty, with a foreword from Brendan O’Neill – comes out in October. Details from Connor Court Publishing here.

PRIME – an exciting new free market think tank in Phnom Penh – is looking for interns. Apply here.

And Liberty on the Rocks continues to grow. There is a meet-up in Ballarat next Thursday. Details here.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

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Institute of Public Affairs | Level 2 | 410 Collins Street | Melbourne | Victoria | 3000 | Australia

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No lemonade for you

September 3, 2015

From James Bolt | Thursday, 3 September 2015

The IPA has been named a finalist for the Atlas Network’s prestigious international Templeton Freedom Award for our 20 years of work on the carbon tax. The winner of the US$100,000 prize will be announced at the Atlas Freedom Dinner in New York on 12 November.

The other five finalists are:

If you’re one of the people who braved Q&A on Monday, you would have seen IPA Adjunct Fellow (and host of the ABC’s Between the Lines) Tom Switzer tell Naomi Klein she is “not just immoral but wicked” for opposing capitalism.

Clean energy tax credits are supposed to help the environment. But as this research from the University of California shows, they actually end up helping the rich.

The Senate inquiry into the Nanny State, chaired by IPA member Senator David Leyonhjelm, will be taking place in two weeks. This week, the IPA filed this 39 page submission to the inquiry. Our favourite bit is about how food for volunteer firefighters had to be thrown out because no-one with a food handling certificate was present (page 33).

Hey readers have been captivated by the rise of Jeremy Corbyn in the UK Labour Party. Nick Cohen explains where the Corbyn coup comes from in a fascinating article in this month’s edition of Standpoint.

Who said one vote doesn’t matter? Meet 23 year old college student Jen Henderson who, because of gerrymandering, is the only person eligible to vote on a tax increase in her Missouri district. She must be a Hey reader, because she’s leaning towards voting the tax down.

I don’t think anyone is enjoying Jerry Seinfeld’s transformation into a staunch defender of freedom more than I am. Last month, Jerry and his son had their lemonade stand shut down by police for encouraging illegal parking.

Next Tuesday, John Roskam and Chris Berg will be in Perth for the final leg of the IPA’s national Magna Carta Tour. Register here.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

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Institute of Public Affairs | Level 2 | 410 Collins Street | Melbourne | Victoria | 3000 | Australia

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