Revenge of the Green Blob (and Mr Men)

July 24, 2014

From John Roskam

Today’s Hey is coming to you from someone who last week in parliament was called a ‘climate criminal‘! (I bet you can’t guess who called me that – well – I think you can actually. They’re a special friend of the IPA and a Hey regular!)

Economic growth is egalitarian! And global income inequality is falling as Professor Tyler Cowen said in The New York Times on the weekend.

This from the World Bank shows what’s happened in the 20 years between the fall of the Berlin Wall and the GFC. The first graph is how much the income of people in each income group has increased. The second graph reveals how much still remains to be done.

(In case you’re wondering – an annual income of US $34,000 gets you into the richest 1% of the world.)

Because there’s so much material for it we’re thinking of introducing a new section in Hey called ‘What left-wing academics say about the IPA in The Guardian‘. This week’s entry is from Warwick Smith at the University of Melbourne who accuses the IPA of having ‘ideological motives’! Really? You think?

Michael Gove, the British education minister who criticised the way Mr Men books were used to teach the Second World War was sacked in a Cabinet reshuffle last week.

Gove also wanted children to learn Shakespeare. This from Standpoint on Monday explains why Gove was Britain’s best ever education minister.

The environment minister who took on ‘The Green Blob’ was also sacked. He wrote a brilliant dummy-spit after his sacking about ‘anti-capitalist agitprop groups’ who want to take us back to the ‘Stone Age’. Not surprisingly the Green Blob is upset!

Last week confirms what I wrote about British PM David Cameron last year in my column in The Australian Financial Review. He’s pretty hopeless.

Last month is the 10th anniversary of Fahrenheit 9/11. Mark Steyn teams up with Jean-Luc Godard to explain that Mike Moore is good at making propaganda not movies.

Meanwhile this Iraq war veteran is told he’s not allowed to keep 14 ducks.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

 

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Institute of Public Affairs | Level 2 | 410 Collins Street | Melbourne | Victoria | 3000 | Australia

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Parks and naughty corners – not safe for children

July 17, 2014

From Peter Gregory

Greens leader Christine Milne finally cares about Tasmanian jobs! Last week, she was worried that scrapping the carbon tax would cost jobs…at Hydro Tasmania. It’s just as well she’s come around, given this remarkable chart:

If you think the Tasmanian and South Australian governments’ handling of the economy is bad, take a look at the Singaporean government’s hilarious attempt to deal with problem gambling:

This is a terrible story from Reason of a mother in the US being jailed this month for letting her nine-year-old child go to the park by herself. And here is our FreedomWatch post on the academics who think sending children to the naughty corner is an abuse of their human rights.

The bizarre operation to remove smoking from the historical record of World War Two continues. In March we showed you these photos of Winston Churchill with and without his trademark cigar. Now, American viewers of George Clooney’s new movie The Monuments Men, set during World War Two, are being warned it contains ‘historical smoking’ (FreedomWatch post here).

Still in the states, read this amazing story from Mark Steyn on Monday about an Independence Day float, the Department of Justice and an outhouse.

But it’s not all bad news from America – Reason released a report last week showing that increasing numbers of millennials think government is wasteful and inefficient.

And here’s something else that will cheer you up! After a 10 year legal battle, Amazon has gotten around France’s law against companies offering free shipping of books – by charging 0.01 euros per shipment.

If you’re in Melbourne on 8 and 9 October then you should go and see the IPA’s executive director John Roskam speak at the Council of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences National Forum. Details here.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

 

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Institute of Public Affairs | Level 2 | 410 Collins Street | Melbourne | Victoria | 3000 | Australia

 

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Bill Gates is rich for a reason

July 10, 2014

From James Paterson

While we wait for the Senate to get around to repealing the carbon tax, here’s three things from our elected representatives this week that you’ll love:

1. LDP Senator (and IPA member) David Leyonhjelm’s brilliant maiden speech, delivered in the Senate last night:

2. This entertaining speech, delivered by Queensland MP George Christensen in Las Vegas this week at the Heartland Institute’s 9th International Conference on Climate Change. Christensen laments climate alarmism has become like science fiction – and not the good Star Trek of old kind.

3. Motoring Enthusiasts Party Senator Ricky Muir’s step-by-step guide on how to make the best home-made beer-battered onion rings (who said the Motoring Enthusiasts were a one-issue party?):

In his Australian Financial Review column on Friday, IPA executive director John Roskam said Ricky Muir doesn’t deserve the disdain he’s received from the political class in Canberra. And on The Drum on Tuesday Chris Berg said it isn’t such a bad thing this new Senate resembles ordinary Australians more closely than the last one.

It’s no wonder Bill Gates is one of the world’s richest men. He’s worked out that cheap energy is good for poor people. Who’d have thunk it? It’s like the time Bono worked out capitalism was good for getting rid of poverty.

This is a remarkable speech by Anthony Daniels, who writes as Theodore Dalrymple for The Spectator, delivered at Hillsdale College in May on the decline of England.

This week’s crazy Conversation article really takes the cake. Apparently CCTV surveillance is all the fault of…wait for it…Friedrich Hayek and Milton Friedman.

The IPA has just published the latest book in our Foundations of Western Civilisation monograph series. Richard Allsop’s Liberalism: A Short History was sent to IPA premier members last week, and is now available for purchase. You can read more about this important new book, and order it online, here.

Former IPA research fellow Asher Judah’s new book from Connor Court, The Australian Century, will be launched in Melbourne on Wednesday July 30th. And don’t forget to RSVP for the IPA’s launches of Ian Plimer’s latest book, Not For Greens, in Melbourne on Tuesday 22nd July and in Brisbane on Monday 28 July.

And finally, it must be opposites day over at the Human Rights Commission – they’re holding a conference on free speech! And they’ve even invited Chris Berg to speak. Full details here.

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

 

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Institute of Public Affairs | Level 2 | 410 Collins Street | Melbourne | Victoria | 3000 | Australia

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The World Cup of Communism

July 3, 2014

From Peter Gregory

On Monday Jenny Macklin insisted Australia’s welfare system is not “out of control“. Below, the IPA’s Dr Julie Novak research tells the real story: 

What issue has been engrossing The Washington Post, The New York Times, the American Enterprise Institute, the Heritage Foundation and even The Guardian? It’s this by Ann Coulter ‘America’s favorite national pastime: hating soccer‘ (and here is her follow up).

On Tuesday in The Drum Ben Pobjie hilariously confirmed Coulter’s suspicions that the tournament in Brazil is the World Cup of Communism by proving that the offside rule punishes individual initiative.

If you’re not a soccer fan – please move on to the next paragraph. If you are, this is a must-read 4,653 word essay on Lionel Messi’s left foot from FiveThirtyEight on Tuesday. Make sure you check out scatter graph No. 10 on ‘Value Added vs. Total Offensive Participation’. And this is a terrific 6:50 video from Keith Olbermann on how to make soccer work in America (there are lots of lessons for Australia).  

We should have a segment in Hey for the craziest Conversation article of the week. Last week university deregulation contravened international law. This week, accounting firms have a human rights problem. I can’t wait until next week!      

Click on this picture to find out why Australia gives money to international organisations like the World Health Organisation. It will make you sick…

And you guessed it, the only person more controversial than Ann Coulter this week was James Delingpole, who wore an “I love fossil fuels” t-shirt into the Greenpeace field at Glastonbury music festival.  

From the July/August edition of Standpoint is this fascinating long article by Jeremy Black on how the First World War should be remembered in the centenary year of its commencement. 

And to complete the triumvirate, Ann Coulter, James Delingpole…we have Ian Plimer! The IPA is launching Professor Plimer’s important new book Not for Greens in Melbourne on July 22 and Brisbane on July 28. 

Here’s what else the IPA said this week:

 

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Institute of Public Affairs | Level 2 | 410 Collins Street | Melbourne | Victoria | 3000 | Australia

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